Very low calorie diet weight loss equal to lap band weight loss?

Very low calorie diet weight loss equal to lap band weight loss? A total of 120 obese patients (body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m2) Rx very low calorie diet (LighterLife®, n = 14) for a period of nine months.At nine months, a significant weight loss was maintained for very low calorie diet patients (weight loss −32Kg 70lbs)  Starting … Continue reading Very low calorie diet weight loss equal to lap band weight loss?

Very low calorie diets (VLCDs) as effective as a Lap Band?

Thirty women with a body mass index (BMI) > 27 kg/m2 were enrolled to a 4 weeks intervention with a VLCDPatients lost 35% ± 13% of the excess of weight in only 4 weeks.Significant improvements in triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (Low Density Lipoproteins) were observed. Insulin resistance determined by Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), … Continue reading Very low calorie diets (VLCDs) as effective as a Lap Band?

Physical activity does not attenuate the obesity risk of TV viewing in youth.

Pediatr Obes. 2012 Feb 21. doi: 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2011.00021.x. [Epub ahead of print]Physical activity does not attenuate the obesity risk of TV viewing in youth.Rey-López JP, Ruiz JR, Vicente-Rodríguez G, Gracia-Marco L, Manios Y, Sjöström M, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Moreno LA; HELENA Study Group.SourceGrowth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development (GENUD) Research Group, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.AbstractOBJECTIVE:This study aimed to examine the association of television (TV) time, the frequency of meals … Continue reading Physical activity does not attenuate the obesity risk of TV viewing in youth.

Sugar is Toxic!

Is Sugar Toxic?Kenji Aoki for The New York TimesBy GARY TAUBESPublished: April 13, 2011RECOMMENDTWITTERLINKEDINSIGN IN TO E-MAILPRINTREPRINTSSHARE On May 26, 2009, Robert Lustig gave a lecture called “Sugar: The Bitter Truth,” which was posted on YouTube the following July. Since then, it has been viewed well over 800,000 times, gaining new viewers at a rate of about 50,000 … Continue reading Sugar is Toxic!

Obesity accounts for 21 percent of U.S. health care costs

Obesity accounts for 21 percent of U.S. health care costs Obesity now accounts for almost 21 percent of U.S. health care costs -- more than twice the previous estimates, reports a new Cornell study.By Susan KelleyThe research, which is the first to show the causal effect of obesity on medical care costs, uses new methods and makes … Continue reading Obesity accounts for 21 percent of U.S. health care costs

STAT OF THE DAY 20.6% of U.S. Health Care Costs Are Caused by Obesity Tobyotter/Flickr Share Print article Email article Comments (39) DINO GRANDONI 2,702 ViewsAPR 13, 2012 America, we’ve told you this before. You’ve put on a few these past few decades. And beside those new pairs of jeans you had to buy, we now know just how much your ever-expanding waist is costing you in yet another way: Doctor’s bills. According to a newly peer-reviewed study out of Cornell University, 20.6 percent of the health care costs in the U.S. is caused by obesity. That turns out to be $190.2 billion, in 2005 dollars — or to put in more understandable terms for Americans, about 62 billion Big Macs that year. Though the link between fat and medical bills is pretty well established, what with obesity being an underlying factor for diabetes, heart disease, and even some cancers, this latest estimate for the total cost of obesity in the U.S. is 2.2 times higher then the previous ones. Those costs, of course, aren’t distributed evenly among taxpayers. Health care costs are $2,741 higher for the obese than for the non-obese. Nevertheless, obesity inevitably places a financial burden on government-funded medical programs. So suddenly, Michelle Obama’s small but persistent crusade to get kids to eat their fruits and vegetables seems less mockable. Want to add to this story? Let us know in comments or send an email to the author at dgrandoni@theatlantic.com. You can share ideas for stories on the Open Wire. Sources The medical care costs of obesity: An instrumental variables approach, John Cawley and Chad Meyerhoefer, Journal of Health Economics

STAT OF THE DAY20.6% of U.S. Health Care Costs Are Caused by ObesityDINO GRANDONI2,702 ViewsAPR 13, 2012America, we've told you this before. You've put on a few these past few decades. And beside those new pairs of jeans you had to buy, we now know just how much your ever-expanding waist is costing you in yet … Continue reading STAT OF THE DAY 20.6% of U.S. Health Care Costs Are Caused by Obesity Tobyotter/Flickr Share Print article Email article Comments (39) DINO GRANDONI 2,702 ViewsAPR 13, 2012 America, we’ve told you this before. You’ve put on a few these past few decades. And beside those new pairs of jeans you had to buy, we now know just how much your ever-expanding waist is costing you in yet another way: Doctor’s bills. According to a newly peer-reviewed study out of Cornell University, 20.6 percent of the health care costs in the U.S. is caused by obesity. That turns out to be $190.2 billion, in 2005 dollars — or to put in more understandable terms for Americans, about 62 billion Big Macs that year. Though the link between fat and medical bills is pretty well established, what with obesity being an underlying factor for diabetes, heart disease, and even some cancers, this latest estimate for the total cost of obesity in the U.S. is 2.2 times higher then the previous ones. Those costs, of course, aren’t distributed evenly among taxpayers. Health care costs are $2,741 higher for the obese than for the non-obese. Nevertheless, obesity inevitably places a financial burden on government-funded medical programs. So suddenly, Michelle Obama’s small but persistent crusade to get kids to eat their fruits and vegetables seems less mockable. Want to add to this story? Let us know in comments or send an email to the author at dgrandoni@theatlantic.com. You can share ideas for stories on the Open Wire. Sources The medical care costs of obesity: An instrumental variables approach, John Cawley and Chad Meyerhoefer, Journal of Health Economics

Bariatric Surgery in Context: An Obesity Consult

Bariatric Surgery in Context: An Obesity ConsultHenry R. Black, MD; Louis J. Aronne, MDAuthors and DisclosuresPosted: 04/11/2012Henry R. Black, MD: Hi, I'm Dr. Henry Black. I'm Clinical Professor of Internal Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine, a member of the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at that institution, and immediate past … Continue reading Bariatric Surgery in Context: An Obesity Consult

Bariatric Surgery Beats Standard Therapy in Obese Diabetics

Bariatric Surgery Beats Standard Therapy in Obese DiabeticsLisa Nainggolan and Laurie Barclay, MDAuthors and Disclosures  Print This Email thisShare     1 in 2 U.S. physicians use Medscape ReferenceMore current. More comprehensive. Free. Access now >March 26, 2012 (Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH) ( UPDATED March 27, 2012 ) — Bariatric surgery performed considerably better than traditional medical therapy in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, … Continue reading Bariatric Surgery Beats Standard Therapy in Obese Diabetics

Obesity and Bar…

Obesity and Bariatrics for the EndoscopistNew TechniquesBarham K. Abu Dayyeh; Christopher C. ThompsonAuthors and DisclosuresPosted: 11/21/2011; Ther Adv Gastroenterol. 2011;4(6):433-442. © 2011 Sage Publications, Inc.  Print This Email this    Abstract and IntroductionThe Role of Endoscopy in the Management of Post-RYGB Surgery ComplicationsThe Role of Endoscopy in the Primary Management of Obesity and Metabolic DiseaseConclusionReferencesAbstract and IntroductionAbstractObesity and its associated conditions, including type … Continue reading Obesity and Bar…